navigation-background arrow-down-circle Reply Icon Show More Heart Delete Icon wiki-circle wiki-square wiki arrow-up-circle add-circle add-square add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up calendar-circle chat-bubble-2 chat-bubble check-circle check close contact-us credit-card drag menu email embed facebook-circle facebook-square facebook faq-circle faq film gear google-circle google-square google history home instagram-circle instagram-square instagram linkedin-circle linkedin-square linkedin load monitor Video Player Play Icon person pinterest-circle pinterest-square pinterest play readlist remove-circle remove-square remove search share sign-out star trailer trash twitter-circle twitter-square twitter youtube-circle youtube-square youtube

You have to have a valid membership to attend this event

You have to have a valid membership to attend this event

Baseball Hall Of Fame Candidates With Orioles Ties

November 27, 2017
The Baseball Hall of Fame ballots mailed out last week include eight players with Orioles connections. Here's a look at those candidates.
 
Mike Mussina
 
Of the eight players, Mussina is most closely identified with the Orioles. The right-hander pitched 10 of his 18 seasons with the Orioles and the other eight with the New York Yankees.
 
Mussina's Hall of Fame case is a strong one. He went 270-153 for a .638 winning percentage, and his 3.68 ERA was exemplary for a pitcher spending his entire career in the American League East.
 
While he won 20 games only in his final season (2008), Mussina won 18 or 19 five other times -- four with the Orioles.
 
His 1.192 WHIP was excellent, and he walked just two batters per nine innings.
 
In his first four years of eligibility, Mussina's vote has climbed to 51.8 percent, and though he's unlikely to be elected this year because of an abundance of quality candidates, he should achieve the 75 percent of the vote needed in the next several years.
 
Jim Thome
 
One of those quality candidates, Thome finished out his stellar 22-year career playing 28 games for the Orioles in 2012. Thome, who was a third baseman, first baseman and designated hitter, hit the final three of his 612 home runs with the Orioles.
 
He had a terrific .402 career on-base percentage and a .956 OPS.
 
Along with Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones, Thome should be a first ballot Hall of Famer, and while his plaque will include the Orioles, he'll be far more remembered for his time with the Cleveland Indians, Chicago White Sox and Philadelphia Phillies.
 
Vladimir Guerrero
 
While Guerrero played only his final season (2011) with the Orioles, his tenure with the team is crucial to his Hall of Fame case.
 
Guerrero, who was exclusively a designated hitter with the Orioles, had 163 hits that season, which allowed him to exceed 2,500. That September, he became the leader in hits among players born in the Dominican Republic. (Adrian Beltre and Albert Pujols have since passed him).
 
Last year, Guerrero nearly made the Hall in his first year of eligibility with 71.7 percent, and he stands a good chance of election this time.
 
Curt Schilling
 
Schilling came to the Orioles in 1988 from the Boston Red Sox along with outfielder Brady Anderson for starter Mike Boddicker in one of the better trades ever made by the team, and he left before the 1991 season in one of its worst trades.
 
The right-hander was sent to the Houston Astros along with outfielder Steve Finley, who also enjoyed a long career, and pitcher Pete Harnisch for first baseman Glenn Davis, who had an injury-marred three seasons in Baltimore.
 
Schilling recorded his first major league win for the Orioles in 1990 -- his other 215 came with the Astros, Philadelphia Phillies, Arizona Diamondbacks and Red Sox.
 
In addition to his 216 wins, Schilling struck out more than four times as many batters as he walked.
 
Schilling got 52.3 percent of the vote in 2017 but slipped to 45 percent in his fifth year of eligibility last year. His chances of election are questionable.
 
Jamie Moyer
 
The left-hander won 25 games from 1993-1995 for the Orioles, who were one of eight teams he pitched for.
 
Though Moyer won 269 games in 25 seasons, he was never considered a dominant pitcher.
 
It will be interesting to see if Moyer, in his first year of eligibility, receives the 5 percent of the vote needed to stay on the ballot.
 
Sammy Sosa
 
Sosa had the worst year of his major league career with the Orioles in 2005. The slugger batted .221 and had 14 of his 609 home runs that season.
 
Because suspicions of steroid use tainted his reputation, Sosa received 8.6 percent of the vote in his fifth year of eligibility in 2017, and it seems unlikely he'll ever be inducted.
 
Aubrey Huff and Kevin Millwood
 
Huff and Millwood are eligible because they played at least 10 years in the major leagues and were accepted by the Hall of Fame's screening committee, but it would be a surprise if either got even a single vote.
 
Huff, who played first base, third base and was a DH with the Orioles, was named Most Valuable Oriole in 2008, his second of three years with the team, when he batted .304 with 32 home runs and 108 RBIs.
 
In 2010, Millwood's only season with the Orioles, the right-hander led the American League with 16 losses. 

Photo Credit: Mitch Stringer/PressBox